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Article alert: Climate change and forest management - Accordances and differences between the German states regarding assessments for needs and strategies towards forest adaptation
24.03.2010

by: Ulla Vänttinen

Bolte, A., Eisenhauer, D.-R., Ehrhart, H.-P., Groß, J., Hanewinkel, M., Kölling, C., Profft, I., Rohde, M., Röhe, P., Amereller, K. 2009. Climate change and forest management - Accordances and differences between the German states regarding assessments for needs and strategies towards forest adaptation | [Klimawandel und forstwirtschaft- übereinstimmungen und unterschiede bei der einschätzung der anpassungsnotwendigkeiten und anpassungsstrategien der bundesländer] Landbauforschung Volkenrode 59 (4), pp. 269-278.

Abstract
A federal working group of German forest research that was mandated by the Federal Forest Task Force (FCK) reports on the accordances and differences between the German states (Bundeslaender) regarding assessments of forest adaptation to climate change. Regarding the threats of climate change and the possibility of adaptation to it, responses were mostly quite similar within the group. The highly significant nature of climate change and the scope of its regional impacts were evaluated by the respondents in a similar manner. The important role of biotic threats was likewise acknowledged by all parties. We found also only slight differences in the assessment of forest tree species' adaptive potential to climate change: Norway spruce is expected to have low adaptive potential whereas the introduced species Douglas fir and red oak will presumably be more highly adaptive. Several native species are still considered to be quite tolerant against climate change effects as well. However, differences are obvious regarding adaptation strategies. Some states prefer active adaptation (e.g. forest transformation aiming at replacing sensitive tree species), while others prefer a combination of active adaptation and risk minimization strategies (e.g. by establishing tree species mixtures). Passive adaptation is predominantly a less preferred option. All respondents agreed on the need for more intensive interdisciplinary research and for coordinated trials concerning forest adaptation and forest management in the face of climate change.

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http://www.scopus.com/source/sourceInfo.url?sourceId=73382&origin=resultslist

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